Marion, Isaac: Warm Bodies (2011)

Warm Bodies

Warm Bodies is Isaac Marion‘s first novel. He has an interesting take on zombieism. According to the world of Warm Bodies, zombieism is not necessarily a permanent state. Just because something is, doesn’t necessarily mean that it has to remain so. But change will bring resistance from the more conservative (both living and zombies).

The main problem with this novel is that it’s message is too obvious at times – in fact spelled out. I felt as though I was being preached at. This is a first novel, though, and as such – pretty good.

I liked the way “R”‘s, the main protagonist, journey was presented. The road from moan and groan to being able to make himself understood on many levels was interesting. It gets kind of gory at times but probably not more than most teen-literature today.

There’s plenty of humor. I especially appreciated the way the schools for the living and the schools for the dead were.


Reviews:


Film-adaptation acquired 2010 by Summit Entertainment to be released 2013

Grindle, Lucretia: The Faces of Angels (2006)

The Faces of Angels by Lucretia Grindle

I have not been able to find an official website or blog for Lucretia (Walsh) Grindle.

In The Faces of Angels we meet Mary Warren. Mary Warren is a widow who lost her husband while they were on their honey-moon in Firenze. At that time Mary herself was attacked and almost lost her life as well.

The Faces of Angels introduces Inspector Pallioti. In this novel, he is trying to figure out who is killing off people Mary Warren has come into contact with. During a previous visit Mary, herself, was nearly killed. Her husband was murdered. Right after she returns to Florence, the killings begin again. It seems the serial killer has taken an interest in Mary.

Rituals for serial killers seems to be a must. So too with this killer. The murders are brutal and the victims are left with little gifts.

I’m reminded me of most British mysteries, where suspicion is moved from one person to the other (while one person after the other is killed). This novel is above average in its execution. Grindle has managed to keep the atmosphere tense through most of the novel. At times the flow hiccups, but for the most part Grindle manages to draw me from one line to the other.

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The other Inspector Anthony Pallioti mystery is The Villa Triste

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The Edgar Allan Poe Awards® 2012: Nominee for The Best Paperback Original

Rothfuss, Patrick: The Wise Man’s Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle II) (2011)

French cover by Mark Simonetti

The Wise Man's Fear

This novel is a brick of a book – 994 pages short. It is also book no. 2 in The Kingkiller’s Chronicle. You must read no. 1 – The Name of the Wind – first. Otherwise The Wise Man’s Fear will make little sense.

These are the only possible negative things that I have to say about this series. Patrick Rothfuss certainly knows how to write a tale of magic and suspense. I struggled to put the novel down at night and would read for far too long before going to bed. It has been well worth the wait.

As in The Name of the Wind, we have our innkeeper, Kote,  telling the story of his younger days as Kvothe. Kvothe is known as “The Kingkiller” and The Kingkiller’s Chronicle is his attempt at explaining the circumstances that led up to the assassination.

Kvothe is an interesting character. He’s a wonderful mix of dark and light, death and life. There is an innocence about him in spite of his earlier experiences and his willingness to get dark and dirty.

He continues at University in this sequel. Like in the previous novel, Kvothe struggles to make his tuition and still has to support himself by working beside his studies. Kind of sounds like modern-day students, huh.

Kvothe’s ambitions are high and he pays a price for them. Perhaps too high a price in the end. His ongoing battle with Ambrose is costing him. Finally, he is advised to take position somewhere so he can both learn what being a magician is all about and also to get out of Ambrose’s way.

Kvothe goes. He’ll have lots of experiences on the road, some for good and some as plain learning experiences.


My review of The Name of the Wind


Deviant Art: some amazing and some not quite as amazing fanart


2012: David Gemmell award: LEGEND AWARD (BEST BOOK): The Wise Man’s Fear – Patrick Rothfuss

Gilman, Felix: The Half-Made World (2010)

The Half-Made World
Cover artist Ross MacDonald and Jamie Stafford-Hill

The Half-Made World is a combination of fantasy and science fiction set in a Western (Wild West) environment. Half the forces battling in The Half-Made World is set in a Wild West setting and ruled by something called “The Gun”. The Gun consists of demons inhabiting weapons (guns). Humans who take up these weapons end up being possessed by The Gun’s demons and slowly, but surely, they go insane.

The other party of this war is “The Line”. The Line is set in an industrialised environment where steam-engines are possessed by demons and somehow rule the humans in their control. This industrialised world is bleak, colorless and rigid. Both parties want  control of the world with humans as their slaves.

Humans, being what we are, seek to control others through supposed control of the demons. Any reader of human/demon novels knows that humans tend to come out with the poorer deal of any relationship between the two. Power is the lure the demons put before whichever human they seek to control. Ahhh, even people with the best intentions can fall for that temptation.

Somehow a weapon has been discovered that might elude the power of the demons and they do like this possibility. Their emissaries are sent to capture the person known as The General. He just happens to be at a hospital called The House Dolorous, a hospital that is not what it seems to be.

Liv Alverhuysen travels west to the hospital. She is from a part of the country where neither The Line nor The Gun hold control and is not aware of what they are and how strong their forces are. Once at The House Dolorous, Ms. Alverhuysen is supposed to help heal the minds of patients. The various parties meet and fates decided.

I really liked the underlying sense of humor in this novel. The Half-made World is well written, and the text flows from one line to the next. I admire that in an author. There is plenty of tension, a good climax and a fitting conclusion.

Morgan, Richard: Altered Carbon (2002)

Altered Carbon to be used

I like mysteries. Anything from Agatha Christie to Richard Morgan. They’re all the same, in a sense. Some crime happens and the detective (police or private) comes on the scene and (usually) miraculously solves the crime. The route from A to B varies, but in essence they’re all the same. That’s why they’re so fun.

Add mystery to cyber-punk. Cyber-punk tends to be cynical and dark. Altered Carbon sticks to that kind of tone. Maybe the whole concept of having our personalities stored and ready to be placed into new bodies is a theme that lends itself to exploitation and conflict. Imagine what a person holding immense power, such as the leader of a mega-corporation, could do with access to both bodies and personalities. The lure of power is what keeps the “baddie” of Altered Carbon doing their terrible deeds.

When Takeshi Kovacs, former United Nations Envoy and a native of Harlan’s World, is killed on Harlan’s World (humans now live on various planets in our galaxy) his personality is beamed from Harlan to Old Earth (good old Terra) for a mission where his only choice is do or die (or even do and die).

There he is expected to solve the mystery of what really happened to Laurens Bancroft. Laurens Bancroft is a Meth (Methusalem from the Old Testament). As the name indicates, Mehts live an incredibly long time through resleeving their personality into new bodies. Imagine living like that and the effects time would have upon you. I imagine that in order to choose such a path and to stay on it for centuries you would have to be somewhat of a psychopath. Otherwise you would probably go insane from every one else around you dying. Insane or not Mr. Bancroft’s death has the verdict of suicide. The reason Kovacs has been revived is due to disagreement about the verdict. Here we arrive at the who-dun-it.

Takeshi Kovacs is an enjoyable character. His past haunts him and being in a new body takes some getting used to. There is explicitness in Altered Carbon. I don’t mind that, but then I am 49 years old and not 15.

I like that Mr. Morgan has kept Kovacs alive past Altered Carbon. He is a character well worth knowing – complicated.


Altered Carbon won the Philip K. Dick Award for best novel in 2003


Movie rights have been bought but the film has not been released yet. Updates on IMDB.

deRosnay, Tatiana: Sarah’s Key (2007)

Sarah's Key

Sarah’s Key was lent to me by my sister. Serendipity. I found it a page-turner. No question about it. The author manages to switch from present to past without effort. Tatiana deRosnay is a truly gifted author.

Sarah’s Key is about poor little Sarah Starzynski. The Germans come to collect her family. To protect her little brother she locks him in a cupboard and tells him that she will be back in a few hours. Alas. The fates want it otherwise.

There are two time-lines to Sarah’s Key. The first one, of course, follows Sarah. The second time-line follows the story of the journalist, Julia Jarmon, who delves into the story behind a hidden skeleton. Along follows the secrecy behind Jews in France during WWII.

Some truths are painful for a nation to acknowledge. Nevertheless, healing comes through shining a light on both what we want visible and what we want hidden.

The story is wholly fictional, but as Leo Bretholz (Holocaust survivor) says: “The perusal of Sarah’s Key evoked memories of my own experiences during the war in the Vichy zone of France.” It tells a terrible story, one that has happened over and over again in history. It reminds us of how easily we turn our heads from what is happening around us.


French film-adaptation (Elle s’appelait Sarah) in 2010 by Stéphane Marsil (won two awards and had three nominations)


“Holocaust in France was encouraged by French anti-Semitic trends which created a climate where the French offered assistance to the German forces, who without such aid, could not have carried out, to such ends, the Final Solution in France.” (Elizabeth Ciarrocca)


Use public libraries

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