Pratchett, Terry: Dodger (2012)

Premerie of Terry Pratchett's Dodger - Adapted by Stephen Briggs
Studio Theatre Club presents “Dodger”

YES! I’ve read Dodger. Genius once again. Way to go Terry!

While reading Dodger, it is easy to see where Pratchett got his inspiration for the Discworld from. We get a behind-the-scenes look at the various fictional and real characters that have shown up in various forms in his novels.

I am certain there is a whole sleuth of People out there waiting to catch Pratchett and his Alzheimer out. Phooey.

Dodger from 22 to 26 January 2013

Terry attacks Dodger in the same way he has written most of his other books: With a great sense of humour and tons of warmth.

Pratchett’s portrayal of Victorian London leaves out nothing when it comes to poverty and the struggle for survival. Not everyone who came to London met with good fortune. In fact, most were probably on the wrong end of dark deeds done and would themselves have preferred to be on the other side of that act.

Stench, filth, disease and poverty were rampant in the less than lovely city of the 1800s. However, it does make for an excellent backdrop to Dodger’s dealings with fictional characters and characters from history books. Not all of them belong in the era portrayed, but Pratchett isn’t exactly known for writing historical novels. As the quote on his page states: “In the bathtub of history the truth is harder to hold than the soap, and much more difficult to find…”

Dodger is a delightful character (as well as being the title of the book). He ties the various stories together in his fight to keep the mysterious love of his life, Simplicity, out of the hands of her assailants. This tosher uses his place of work to aid in his heroic deeds. The sewers of London have never smelled better.


EXTRAS

Stage adaptation by Stephen Briggs

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